12/10/17 ~ Love Songs of God

From the Preacher’s Pen…

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There is always a danger in oversimplifying anything. To say that the basic ingredients of a cake are all that’s needed to actually have cake is to miss the importance of both so-called minor ingredients and all the work that goes into properly mixing, baking and ultimately serving a cake.

When it comes to the Bible we hear many similar simplifications both by teachers discussing the scriptures and from within God’s word itself. Hopefully, we are intelligent enough to appreciate those simplifications and the lessons they teach as well as incorporate them into the larger overall lessons from God.

One example of this lesson is what we commonly call the “five steps to salvation.” They serve the purpose of summarizing God’s will. But no one that really studies God’s word believes for a single moment that by quickly checking off five items on a list that they can then get back to their lives and, somehow, magically be saved. And yet there is much to be learned from what that simple lesson tells us of God.

A similar summary is sometimes expressed like this: The New Testament is God’s love letter to us. Actually, it would be more accurate to say that all of the Bible is God’s love letter, but even then we need to realize how much there is to that statement.
To begin with, what about our love for Him. Love cannot last as a one-sided affair. So consider and explore for a moment a few of the lessons of the…

Love Songs of God

One of the most prominent themes of God’s relationship with His people is that of love. So important is this theme that John bluntly says that, without love, we do not know God (1 John 4:8). He would go on to say that if we live in love, God’s kind of love, then God lives in us (1 John 4:16).

Throughout God’s word, He portrays the relationship that He has with His people as the perfect love of husband and wife. Solomon in the Song of Solomon would paint perhaps the ultimate picture of love between husband and wife here on earth. With that picture God would paint the ultimate picture of love between God and His bride.

The Psalmists would remind us of our Lord’s righteousness and love of righteousness (Psalm 11:7). They would remind us of our love for Him (Psalm 18:1) and challenge us as God’s people to love our Lord (Psalm 31:23).

Certainly, one of the greatest tragedies in scripture is that of Hosea as the prophet sees portrayed in his own life the same love story that God shares with His people. A relationship that begins with love will turn to sorrow in unfaithfulness, love rejected, only to have true love continue.

Love that gives, even when hurt and rejected, is love that is true. Love that forgives and keeps on loving is the only love that is worthy of its name. All else is merely infatuation, fake love without strength or purpose.

The New Testament reminds us that it is the ultimate fulfilment of God’s Old Testament lessons and illustrations. Paul applies that to the love of Jesus for His bride, the church (cf. Ephesians 5:21-32). He loved us even while we were unlovable, while we were still sinners (cf. Romans 5:8).

Perhaps it is only natural that when humans think of love, real love, that they so often use terms from God’s word for that ultimate standard.

A few weeks ago I turned the radio on in the car and heard an older (1964) song. Listening to the words I thought of this very point:

  • There’s a new world somewhere they call the promised land 
  • And I’ll be there someday if you could hold my hand   
  • I still need you there beside me  no matter what I do  
  • For I know I’ll never find another you

One of the greatest pleasures of our children and grandchildren is holding that little hand and sharing the tenderness of a moment. How precious to know that our God loves us like that and loves us enough to walk with us.

  • But if I should lose your love, dear, I don’t know what I’d do  
  • For I know I’ll never find another you

How bitterly sad that moment when Adam and Eve realized they would never again be able to walk together with God in the Garden. How agonizing to imagine that we could never again take His hand and walk with Him.

  • It’s a long, long journey, so stay by my side   
  • When I walk through the storm, you’ll be my guide, be my guide   
  • If they gave me a fortune, my pleasure would be small.   
  • I could lose it all tomorrow and never mind at all.   
  • But if I should lose your love, dear, I don’t know what I’d do   
  • For I know I’ll never find another you.

How precious are those promises and hopes of His faithfulness, His forgiveness, His love.  The very knowledge of God’s love for us ought to cause us to love and give Him our all.

Solomon’s ultimate story of love between a man and a woman, a husband and a wife, is called the Song of Songs. James would remind us that, if we are cheerful, we should sing songs (James 5:13). Certainly, it is most appropriate of us as Christians that we should sing of His love for us. (Be sure to check out your hymnbook and notice how many songs deal with God’s love for us and our love for Him!)

If we lose God’s love we will have lost everything for all eternity. We will never find another one like our God. Let’s make sure we never lose such love!

— Lester P. Bagley

(Lyrics from I’ll Never Find Another You by Tom Springfield)

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